Crisis Services

 

 

 

The FSS Crisis Services Team provides assistance to victims of sexual assault, family violence and human trafficking in Amarillo, Texas and surrounding areas of the Texas Panhandle. Our programs are designed to provide safety as well as advocacy for victims, along with the prevention of these crimes.

 

Crisis Intervention and Advocacy Services are available on a walk-in basis (no appointment necessary) during FSS hours of operation (8 am-8 pm Mon-Thurs, 8 am-4:30 pm on Fri). Crisis Advocacy is also available after-hours at Northwest Texas Hospital, the Bridge, and other designated locations. Crisis services are offered at no charge.

 

Services available include:

  • Safe shelter in our Emergency Safe House for victims who are in imminent danger
  • On-Site Kennel at Safe House so pets don't have to be left behind.
  • Face-to-face crisis intervention
  • 24-hour Crisis Hotline, 374-5433 (LIFE) or Spanish 1-800-799-7233 (National)
  • Advocacy services, including accompaniment through medical, legal, and judicial systems
  • An accredited crisis volunteer advocate program serving victims who present at Northwest Texas Hospital or The Bridge Children’s Advocacy Center
  • Public education services to increase knowledge of the dynamics of sexual violence and family violence, the causes and consequences of both, and the related intervention and prevention services that FSS provides.
  • Family Violence Support Group: Held every Tuesday at 6 pm- 1001 S. Polk Street.
  • Sexual Assault Survivors Group: Held every Thursday at 5:45 pm- 1001 S. Polk Street.

 

 

 

Domestic Violence

Within an intimate partnership or romantic relationship, Domestic Violence is defined as controlling and/or manipulative behaviors by one partner toward the other partner, more than just a one-time behavior, but a pattern of hurtful and aggressive behavior designed specifically for the gain of the person doing the hurting.  There are several different types of controlling behaviors a person can use to hurt a partner.  These tactics of control include physical aggression, emotional hurt, aggression or manipulation of a sexual nature, controlling all the money in the relationship, using religious beliefs as a tactic of control, as well as harassment and stalking behaviors.

 

These hurtful behaviors don’t usually begin early in the relationship – these relationships start out wonderful, exciting, thrilling, and sexy.  They start out just like every other relationship.  But as time passes, the controlling partner begins to use tactics in small, subtle ways to get what they want, which initially doesn’t seem abusive.  As more time passes, the tactics become more intense and the partner gets more of the control and satisfaction they want.  The tactics of control then are no longer subtle and “not very often,” but are more intense, more hurtful, more controlling, more degrading, more humiliating, more dehumanizing.  By this time, the victim has spent a lot of time hiding bruises, lying to family about the problems in the relationship, disconnecting from friends trying to make the other partner happy.  They have spent weeks or months or years justifying the abusive partner’s behaviors as coming from stress, a bad childhood, drug use, or many other excuses that would eventually go away. . . but never did.

 

Domestic Violence happens in male-female relationships, male-male relationships, and female-female relationships.  Domestic violence happens in all levels of our society:  no matter poor or rich;  no matter race/ethnicity or country of origin;  no matter age, education, social standing;  no matter occupation;  no matter religion;  no matter sexual orientation.  By the time the victim in the relationship sees that they are being hurt and degraded and even systematically abused, often they have no idea where to go to get help.

 

That is why Family Support Services is here.  The Crisis Advocates are available to answer questions, provide support and information, assist in planning, all without cost to the victim.  Our Crisis Advocates do not tell victims what to do – we listen, and give information.  And as the victim finds a path, the victim can become a Survivor.  Domestic Violence.  Within an intimate partnership or romantic relationship, Domestic Violence is defined as controlling and/or manipulative behaviors by one partner toward the other partner, more than just a one-time behavior, but a pattern of hurtful and aggressive behavior designed specifically for the gain of the person doing the hurting.  There are several different types of controlling behaviors a person can use to hurt a partner.  These tactics of control include physical aggression, emotional hurt, aggression or manipulation of a sexual nature, controlling all the money in the relationship, using religious beliefs as a tactic of control, as well as harassment and stalking behaviors.

 

These hurtful behaviors don’t usually begin early in the relationship – these relationships start out wonderful, exciting, thrilling, and sexy.  They start out just like every other relationship.  But as time passes, the controlling partner begins to use tactics in small, subtle ways to get what they want, which initially doesn’t seem abusive.  As more time passes, the tactics become more intense and the partner gets more of the control and satisfaction they want.  The tactics of control then are no longer subtle and “not very often,” but are more intense, more hurtful, more controlling, more degrading, more humiliating, more dehumanizing.  By this time, the victim has spent a lot of time hiding bruises, lying to family about the problems in the relationship, disconnecting from friends trying to make the other partner happy.  They have spent weeks or months or years justifying the abusive partner’s behaviors as coming from stress, a bad childhood, drug use, or many other excuses that would eventually go away. . . but never did.

 

Get Me Out Of Here